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Eugène Delacroix, The Last Words of Marcus Aurelius, n.d. Oil on canvas. The van Asch van Wyck Trust.

Symposium

in conjunction with Delacroix and the Matter of Finish

Sunday, November 3, 2013

 

 

These lectures were delivered on Sunday, November 3, 2013 during a day of intensive debate and discussion on the seminal issues raised by the special traveling exhibition, Delacroix and the Matter of Finish. One purpose of the Symposium was to reopen questions of attribution that still plague Delacroix studies. Themes touched upon included: the challenge of decoding Delacroix's painterly technique and related problems of conservation; the paradox of the Romantic model of individual genius vs. a traditional approach to studio collaboration; the function of the sketch in Delacroix's practice; the evolution of Delacroix's painterly technique, especially in the late work; Delacroix as a bad teacher; the theme of civilization and its discontents; the translation of Delacroix's painterly effects in the print medium; Delacroix and the 18th century; Delacroix and copying; the conduct of connoisseurship in the 21st century; etc.

Symposium

Six speakers addressed different aspects of this rich exhibition. Each 40 min. lecture was followed by a 10 min. response by a pre-designated respondent.
 
8:00-9:00      Check-in
 
9:00-9:20      Eik Kahng
          SBMA Assistant Director and Chief Curator
          Welcome
 
9:20-10:00    Nina Athanassoglou-Kallmyer
          Professor of Art History, University of Delaware
         “Delacroix: The Larger Picture”
 
10:00-10:40  Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby
          Professor of Art History, University of California, Berkeley
          "Incorrectness and Delacroix: Liberty Again"
 
10:40-10:50  Response by Marc Gotlieb
          Director of the Graduate Program and Class of 1955 Memorial
          Professor of Art, Williams College
 
10:50-11:00  Continued discussion
 
11:00-11:40  Margaret MacNamidhe
          Independent Scholar, Chicago
          “Baudelaire’s Mistake? Faces and Figures in Delacroix, from Start to Finish”
 
11:40-11:50  Response by Nina Kallmyer
          Professor of Art History, University of Delaware
 
11:50-12:00  Continued discussion
 
12:00-1:00    Lunch Break
 
1:00-1:40      Anne Larue
          Professor of Comparative Literature, University of Paris, 13
         “Lasalle-Bordes and Delacroix”
 
1:40-1:50      Response by Todd Olson
          Professor of Art History, University of California, Berkeley
 
1:50-2:00    Continued Discussion
 
2:00-2:40    Marc Gotlieb
        Director of the Graduate Program and Class of 1955 Memorial Professor of Art, Williams College
        "Teacher-Student Disasters in Nineteenth-Century Art"
 
2:40-2:50    Response by Margaret MacNamidhe
        Independent Scholar, Chicago
 
2:50-3:00    Continued Discussion
 
3:00-3:30    Coffee Break
 
3:30-4:10    Claire Barry
        Director of Conservation, Kimbell Art Museum
        “The Material Consequences of Some of Delacroix’s Technical Flaws: Remedies?”
 
4:10-4:20    Response by Eric Gordon
        Head of Painting Conservation, The Walters Art Museum
 
4:20-5:00    Open Discussion
Scholars Day
 
Eik Kahng, SBMA Assistant Director and Chief Curator
Welcome
 
 
Gülru Çakmak, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
"Repetition and the Pursuit of Tragic Image: The Case of Medea"
 
 
Susan Strauber, Professor of Art History, Grinnell College
"Delacroix's Hamlet and Ophelia: Gender and Sexuality in the Hamlet Lithographs"
 
 
Eric Gordon, Head of Painting Conservation, The Walters Art Museum
"Some Problematic Aspects of Delacroix's Painting Technique: A Conservator's Perspective"
 
 
Marika Knowles, Assistant Professor of Art History, Grinnell College
"The Finishing Touch of the Imagination: Delacroix and Romanticism's Virtual Artwork"
 
 
Abby Leigh, Artist, New York City
"Color Matters: An Artist's Perspective"
 
 
     
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